• Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction and Revision ACL Reconstruction
  • Rotator Cuff Repair and Revision Rotator Cuff Repair
  • Shoulder Stabilization (Repair for Shoulder Dislocation/Instability)
  • Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction (Tommy John Surgery)
  • Sports Medicine Surgery of Knee, Shoulder, Elbow
  • Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon
  • Subspecialty Certified in Orthopedic Sports Medicine
  • Fellow, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Member of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
  • Member of Arthroscopy Association of North America
  • Stem Cell Therapy
  • Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)
  • Cartilage Restoration Surgery
  • Osteotomies about the Knee
  • Tendon Repair
  • Rotation Medical Collagen Patch for Rotator Cuff

Shoulder

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

How does the Shoulder joint work?

Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

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Rotator Cuff Repair

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

Bankart Repair

Bankart tear is a specific injury to a part of the shoulder joint called the labrum. Labrum is a ring of fibrous cartilage that surrounds the glenoid and stabilizes the shoulder joint.

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain have failed.

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Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

For more information about Shoulder Arthroscopy, click on below tabs.

Labrum Repair

Labrum repair is a surgical technique recommended for treating labrum tear. Labrum is a triangular, fibrous, rigid cartilage structure lining the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder. It provides cushioning support to these two joints. It also deepens the socket and helps to stabilize the joint.

Biceps Rupture

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Biceps Tendon Repair

The biceps muscle is located in front of your upper arm. It helps in bending your elbow as well as in rotational movements of your forearm. Also, it helps to maintain stability in the shoulder joint. The biceps muscle has two tendons, one of which attaches it to the bone in the shoulder and the other attaches at the elbow.

Bicipital Tendonitis

Bicipital tendonitis is the inflammation of the biceps tendon, the tissue that connects muscle to bone in your upper arm, causing pain in the upper arm and shoulder. It is more common in men in the age group of 40 to 60 years and occurs during many sports activities like tennis, baseball, weightlifting and kayaking where overhead movement is involved.

Biceps Tendinosis

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

For more information about Frozen Shoulder click on below tabs.

Arthroscopic Stabilization of Shoulder

Arthroscopic stabilization is a surgical procedure to treat chronic instability of shoulder joint. The shoulder is the most flexible joint in our body making it more susceptible to instability and injury.

SLAP Lesions

The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint. A ‘ball’ at the top of the upper arm bone (the humerus) fits neatly into a ‘socket’, called the glenoid, which is part of the shoulder blade (scapula). The term SLAP (superior –labrum anterior-posterior) lesion refers to an injury of the superior labrum of the shoulder.

SLAP Repair

Your shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the upper arm bone, the shoulder blade and the collarbone. The head of the upper arm bone fits into the socket of the shoulder joint known as the glenoid cavity. The outer edge of the glenoid is surrounded by a strong fibrous tissue called the labrum.

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer’s shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

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Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the condition of painful shoulder limiting the movements because of pain and inflammation. It is also called as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

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Proximal Biceps Tendon Injuries

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Health Library of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

  • Harvard University
  • Columbia University
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases
  •  American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Arthroscopy Association of North America – AANA
  • J. Robert Gladden Orthopaedic Society (JRGOS)
  • Texas Southern University